Favorite Places #2: Inconspicuous Trail Camp Near Mt. Baldy

I must have hiked the Baldy Bowl Trail 6-7 times before exploring a spur trail off the official trail (between the ski hut and Mt. Baldy) that looked like it would be an interesting place to go. If you’ve ever hiked the Baldy Bowl Trail, I’m pretty sure you’ve thought about going there too. Unnamed and unmapped (at least as far as I know), it leads to an inconspicuous trail camp that it is one of my favorite places in the forest.

Spur Trailhead leading to trail camp. Left and down leads to the ski hut.

Spur Trailhead leading to trail camp. Left and down leads to the ski hut.

Normally, when I hike the Baldy Bowl trail I find myself chasing light and never wanting to break out my headlamp to finish off my hike. Last year, I went on a hike with my wife and daughter and we stopped after making the steep climb up to the ridge where this spur trail begins. While they were resting, I finally took the opportunity to go exploring and within a few minutes I found myself in an area that clearly gets used as a trail camp. It’s easy to get to, just follow the spur trail.

The most conspicuous of several sites that are flat and appropriate to set up a tent.

The most conspicuous of several sites that are flat and appropriate to set up a tent with a view down to the city below.

Last Sunday I used it as a wonderful end destination for a few of us who are training to do a multi-day hike of Mt. Whitney at the end of July. We are getting used to carrying full packs and rehydrating meals etc. We will be stepping things up on a weekly basis and hiking the usual training destinations.

View toward Mt. Harwood from another flat area.

View toward Mt. Harwood from another flat area.

We spent a while there enjoying the excellent views and I’m sure I’ll camp there someday. In my opinion, the view from there is much better than that of the Ski Hut area, it isn’t exposed the way the summit of Mt. Baldy is, and it is half the distance to water than it is from Mt. Baldy. I think it would be a great trip to hike up to this campground starting in the afternoon, set up a camp site, then go back down to the creek next to the Ski Hut and filter a bunch of water for the night and the next day’s hike. On the next day, hike up to Mt. Baldy and come back down via Devil’s Backbone.

View out toward Three Tees, Cucamonga Peak, and Ontario Peak.

View out toward Three Tees, Cucamonga Peak, and Ontario Peak. (click to enlarge)

Also on Sunday, I crossed paths with one of my favorite bloggers (Lady on a Rock). Unfortunately, I couldn’t figure out why I recognized her until she was too far away for me to say hello. I also wasn’t entirely sure it was her until I read on her Facebook page that she had hiked to Mt. Baldy that day. Since ours is a very public outdoor activity and with so many people blogging and reading blogs about hiking, I’m sure some of us cross paths but never know it. For those who would enjoy saying a quick hello, I’ve decided to start including photos of me on some of my posts.

Kyle Kuns enjoying the view from his "rocky chair". Photo by Debbie Kuns.

Kyle Kuns enjoying the view from his “rocky chair”. Photo by Debbie Kuns.

Weekly Gallery Update #9: Views From Trails

My Weekly Gallery Updates are about sharing photos I’ve added to the gallery section of this site.  The galleries are my way of creating a visual approach to searching for hikes by having collections of photos that link to information about hiking to where each photo was taken.

This week I added five photos to the Views From Trails gallery.

February 2012

February 2012

Above view from the Mt. Markham Trail looking down Bear Canyon.

December 2012

December 2012

Above view from the Baldy Bowl Trail.

August 2011

August 2011

Above view from the Islip Ridge Trail toward Crystal Lake.

December 2011

December 2011

Above view from the East Mt. Lowe Trail, looking down on Inspiration Point and toward Catalina Island.

December 2011

December 2011

Above view from the Upper San Gabriel Peak Trail.

Snow Hiking in Los Angeles: The Baldy Bowl Trail

This is the second post in a series on snow hiking in Los Angeles.  My first post in this series emphasized an opportunity to hike at relatively low elevations closer to the edge of the city where a recent storm is required for snow to be present and no chains or special equipment are needed.

This one goes to the opposite extreme where snow is guaranteed until sometime in spring.  At 10,064 feet, Mt. Baldy is the highest point in Los Angeles County.  The trailhead from Manker Flats is above 6,100 feet and can often be in snow as well.  There is a ski area and restaurant up at Baldy Notch (elevation over 7,800 feet) and it’s worth taking a look at the weather conditions posted on their website (which typically includes an update on road conditions) before making the trip.  Unlike treks at lower elevations, it is important to carry chains.  It is also important to have microspikes, crampons and/or snowshoes as deep snow and icy conditions are common.  Due to over 3,900 feet of gain on this hike, conditions can change dramatically from a thin layer of mostly slippery ice to snow knee deep or more.  Therefore, I now carry both microspikes and snowshoes.

View of West Mt. Baldy from Mt. Baldy with Catalina Island in the distance.

View of West Mt. Baldy from Mt. Baldy with Catalina Island in the distance.

Interestingly, both times I’ve hiked the Baldy Bowl Trail (aka The Ski Hut Trail) in the snow it was with someone I met on Mt. Baldy last summer while I was training to hike to Mt. Whitney.  If I didn’t write this blog, I wouldn’t have stayed in contact with either of them.

The first hike was with Charles.  At that time, I only had snowshoes and the terrain from the trailhead to the ski hut was mostly soil with patches of ice and some stretches of shallow snow and I was better off carrying my snowshoes up to the ski hut on my back pack.   So, this portion of the trek was slow going and a little slippery for me.  Charles had crampons and experienced no problems.

Mt. San Antonio Ski Hut

Mt. San Antonio Ski Hut

At the ski hut, it didn’t look good from a time perspective for me to make the summit.  There were others there who all had crampons.  One of them had an ice axe and was about to head straight up the bowl.  Another had hiked the bowl in snow numerous times.  It was getting late and we all had concerns about the safety of my hiking the trail without crampons as it would get more icy and slippery after the mountain began to block the sun shining on the trail.  Charles could easily make the summit because his crampons would make it easy to negotiate the trail after dusk.  So, Charles and I agreed that he would go on ahead while I put on my snowshoes.  I would turn back after around 2:00 pm and talk to him later.  After everyone else left and I had my snowshoes on, I met a couple skiers who trekked up to the ski hut (which is nowhere near the maintained ski slopes) and were eventually planning to ski down a ridge that had been very good to them in the past.  At this point I realized that there were at least as many people hiking this trail in the snow as there are without it and that there is a large range of equipment used and activities pursued.

A good thing about so many people hiking this trail in snow is the trail is made clear by those who arrive early.

A good thing about so many people hiking this trail in snow is the trail is made clear by those who arrive early.

It was a pleasure to get my snowshoes on and start snowshoeing in deeper snow as I made my way up the trail.  It turned out to be quicker for me to hike through the rocky base of the bowl in snow than it is in normal conditions as enough snow filled in the space between rocks and made a more uniform surface.

Looking up at the ridge from the base of Baldy Bowl.

Looking up at the ridge from the base of Baldy Bowl.

After passing through the comparatively flat base of the bowl the trail gets steep and the snow became much deeper.  As a result, the advantages of snowshoes on this part of the trail became apparent.  My feet didn’t go as far into the deep snow and the Televators on my snowshoes which support raising my heal while keeping the snowshoe flush with the terrain made it significantly easier to handle the steeper slopes.

One of the steeper portions of the Baldy Bowl Trail.

One of the steeper portions of the Baldy Bowl Trail.

With my new found speed, it didn’t take long to pass Charles.  It soon became clear that I would have a shot at making the summit after all.  I caught up with another hiker named Jim and joined him for the last part of the way to the summit.

Kyle Kuns at Mt. Baldy (photo by Jim).

Kyle Kuns at Mt. Baldy (photo by Jim).

There were excellent views all the way down the mountain.  I was once again slowed below the ski hut allowing Charles to catch up with me after he also made the summit.

View looking down the Baldy Bowl Trail and across toward Thunder Mountain, Telegraph Peak, Timber Mountain, Cucamonga Peak, and Ontario Peak. (click to enlarge).

View looking down the Baldy Bowl Trail and across toward Thunder Mountain, Telegraph Peak, Timber Mountain, Cucamonga Peak, and Ontario Peak. (click to enlarge).

The next hike with Scott was significantly different and he also blogged about it.  Learning from my last trek, I bought a pair of Kahtoola microspikes  which worked fantastically on the lower part of the trail where there was more soil and slippery ice than snow.  These are lightweight enough (and would have been very helpful on my trek to Mt. Whitney) that I’ll be bringing them on this year’s summer trip to the High Sierras.  A key component of this hike was the weather.  The hike began under clear skies with clouds off far in the distance below us.

Clouds off in the distance as seen from the Baldy Bowl Trail below the Ski Hut.

Clouds off in the distance as seen from the Baldy Bowl Trail below the ski hut.

We saw the clouds rolling in as we made our way up the mountain.  After we crossed the base of the bowl and started making our way up the steeper part of the mountain, the clouds started reaching our level.  The view south began to be completely blocked by incoming clouds.

Clouds rolling in along the steeper part of the Baldy Bowl Trail.

Clouds rolling in along the steeper part of the Baldy Bowl Trail.

When the trail met the ridge the view was split between clouds coming up quickly from the south and clear skies to the north.

Clouds to the south, clear skies to the north along the Ridge of the Baldy Bowl Trail.

Clouds to the south, clear skies to the north along the Ridge of the Baldy Bowl Trail. (Click to enlarge)

As we moved higher, the clouds continued moving in quickly and began to darken causing me to start to think about the possibility of getting caught in a snowstorm.

View south from the ridge along the Baldy Bowl Trail.

View south from the ridge along the Baldy Bowl Trail. (click to enlarge)

As impressive as the speed that the clouds were overtaking us was their depth.  At least a few hours from the trailhead, it became unclear whether or not we could summit and make it back down the mountain before snow started.  In addition, Scott was breaking in new hiking boots and it was his first time snowshoeing causing him to be more tired than on his previous summit.  So, we both decided that we wanted to head back.

Tall clouds starting to overtake the higher elevations.

Tall clouds starting to overtake the higher elevations. (Click to enlarge).

The way down was filled with amazing views of fast swirling clouds.  The sky was so turbulent that the scene would usually change before I could snap a photo.

Swirling and turbulent clouds made an amazing trek down to the trailhead.

Swirling and turbulent clouds made an amazing trek down to the trailhead.

At times it felt mostly sunny with only a hint of the cloud formations.

View along the base of the bowl just above the Ski Hut.

View along the base of the bowl just above the Ski Hut. (click to enlarge)

At others we were in the mist of the clouds.

Scott Turner photographing the mist just below the Ski Hut.

Scott Turner photographing the mist just below the Ski Hut.

Once we got below the clouds we were treated to a pretty clear view out to the ocean.

View out toward Catalina Island down near the bottom of the Baldy Bowl Trail.

View out toward Catalina Island down near the bottom of the Baldy Bowl Trail.

I had two very different days where I thought about different challenges.  Hiking in the snow can require special equipment like snow shoes to be safe.  The trail looks different in the snow and will be significantly harder to follow in a storm where lack of visibility can become a serious issue and the trail can disappear with snowfall.  Driving home could become a problem without chains.  All this and more should be considered in determining when to turn back.  The mountain will be there another day.  As recently as last Sunday someone died on this mountain.  This is a hard climb without snow.  If you go, be careful and be willing to turn back too early rather than too late.  That said, this place is amazing and I’ve taken numerous photos of the Baldy Bowl Trail these past two years on over ten assents.  If you’re ready for it, it’s a must do.

The West Baldy Illusion

The first time I hiked to West Baldy I mistakenly thought it was Mt. Baldy until I reached West Baldy and looked back.  When I reached what I later learned was Mt. Baldy from the Devil’s Backbone Trail, there was only a publicly affectionate young couple on the summit who I didn’t want to disturb.  It turns out they were blocking my view of the summit marker.  Looking south I saw what appeared to be a higher peak and assumed it was Mt. Baldy.

View of West Baldy (elevation 9,988′) from Mt. Baldy (elevation 10,064′). Note: photo is taken from just below the summit marker.

So, I headed down along what turned out to be the Old Baldy Trail that leads to the Visitors Center.  Near the saddle I realized I needed to head over to the ridge where I found the West Baldy Trail which I learned on the way back directly connects the two summits.

View of West Baldy along the West Baldy Trail near the saddle.

Reaching what turned out to be West Baldy and looking back I realized I was on a shorter peak.

View of Mt. Baldy from the summit West Mt. Baldy

View toward Mt. Baldy from just below the peak of West Baldy

I find it an interesting illusion and worth the short 1.1 mile round trip to fully experience.

Finally, Some Bighorn!

Sometimes I wake up on a day I’ve planned to hike and really don’t feel like going.  Yesterday was one of those days.  I had lost track of time the night before and hadn’t planned a new hike in an area I hadn’t been. On Wednesday’s I like to do a challenging hike that usually requires me to study the map to make sure I get in enough mileage and elevation gain.  I decided to hike to Mt. Baldy again for the tenth time this year and throw in a side trip to West Baldy.

One of the great things about hiking is that there are unpredictable elements to it.  Between weather, wildlife, and other hikers; I find something unique about every hike no matter how many times I traverse the same trail.  Since I learned about the presence of Bighorn Sheep in certain areas of Angeles Forest (the Mt. Baldy area being one such area), I’ve been looking forward to seeing them in person.  After about forty hikes in those areas, I finally saw some yesterday just below the Ski Hut on the Baldy Bowl Trail.

For close to ten minutes it was just me and four Bighorn Sheep.  They were aware I was there, but just kept foraging.  Three of them are pictured in the photo below.

My moving to different spots to take photos drew their attention, but didn’t cause them to move away.  They just got back to doing what they were doing.

Because they stayed calm and didn’t run off, I got to enjoy watching them while feeling I wasn’t invading their space.

After about ten minutes another hiker came and also had time to take plenty of pictures, followed by three more hikers.  The Bighorn got spooked and ran up the mountain when another hiker with a dog came down the trail.

Finally seeing some Bighorn Sheep made my day.  Unexpected joys like this are what make hiking so special to me.  The day started with me uninspired and ended with me looking forward to my next hike.