Weekly Gallery Update #3: Details, Patterns, and Textures

My Weekly Gallery Updates are about sharing photos I’ve added to the gallery section of this site.  The galleries are my way of creating a visual approach to searching for hikes by having collections of photos that link to information about hiking to where each photo was taken.

This week I’ve added five photos to the Details, Patterns, and Textures Gallery. Perhaps due to my training in architecture, I spend a lot of time looking at my surroundings at different levels of detail.  Most of the photos I share on this site are intended to give a broad overview of the terrain and views that a particular hike or hiking experience encompasses. However I also enjoy looking at the elements around me.  I might look at the trunk of a tree and see an interesting pattern or texture, or I might see a natural assembly of elements that form a composition I enjoy looking at, or I might just find myself focusing on one part of something–e.g. the charred roots of a tree that is still very much alive.

November 2012

November 2012

Above photo taken from Valley Forge Campground

April 2012

April 2012

Above photo taken from the Mt. Waterman Trail.

November 2012

November 2012

Above photo taken from the Valley Forge Trail.

November 2011

November 2011

Above photo taken from the South Fork Trail.

August 2011

August 2011

Above photo taken from the Middle Icehouse Canyon Trail.

Shade and Water along the Gabrieleno Trail

The Gabrieleno National Recreation Trail is about 28 miles long in its entirety.  Importantly, a short portion of the trail is still closed due to the Station Fire from Paul Little to the junction with the Bear Canyon Trail.  For the second time I hiked a short portion of the Gabrieleno trail from Red Box to the Valley Forge Campground. This time I hiked with family and friends on a hot day and it was great to have trees blocking the sun for a large part of the trek.

Starting from the trailhead at Red Box, the trail descends until reaching the Valley Forge Campground.  Most of the way the grade isn’t very steep.

The trail essentially follows the San Gabriel River.  The river is often still visible during the brief periods when the trail leads away from it for a while.  The trail also crosses the river a number of times, but the river isn’t deep enough for that to be a problem.  Fortunately, at times when there is no shade the trail is often by the river.

There were many lizards roaming around on this April day.

Flowers were blooming and it was great to see the bees working their magic.

It’s worth checking out the Haramokngna American Indian Cultural Center located at the parking area for the trailhead.  There are some nice artifacts there and volunteers that can tell you about the history of the area.  They have several events planned through October including a Hike-A-Thon to raise money for the center on June 2 (National Trails Day).